Menu
Destinations

One of 11 Great Salt Lake Islands

Antelope Island

Antelope Island is home to one of the largest publicly owned bison herds.

Elevation: 
5,308 Feet
Located in the heart of the Great Salt Lake, Antelope Island State Park is an oasis of beauty and adventure. Spanning over 28,000 acres and stretching 15 miles long and 5 miles wide, it is Utah’s largest state park and home to some truly remarkable natural wonders. Though largely surrounded by the salt flats of the Great Salt Lake, Antelope Island is teeming with life. From its rocky shorelines to its picturesque prairies and mountains, Antelope Island State Park offers visitors one of the most unique outdoor experiences in all of Utah.

Antelope Island is 25 miles north of Salt Lake City and is the largest of the Great Salt Lake islands. Antelope Island attracts visitors all year but is a summer hot spot. This island has over 30 miles of mountain biking trails, sandy beaches, horseback riding, salty buoyant waters, wildlife, hiking, picnic locations, electric bike rentals, camping, bright star filled night skies and more.

geology

The island’s geology is as diverse as its wildlife. The highest peak on the island, Frary Peak, is over 6500 feet above sea level and offers spectacular views of the Great Salt Lake from a bird’s eye view. Most of the island is composed of layers of sedimentary rock that date back to the late Cretaceous period and contain fossils of extinct animals. The rugged shoreline is made up of a mixture of sand, clay, and volcanic rocks that have been smoothed by the waves over thousands of years.

Wildlife

Antelope Island is home to over 300 species of birds and animals. Some of the more notable species include bison, mountain lions, mule deer, elk, coyotes, badgers, and numerous other mammals. In addition to these larger animals, visitors can also find a variety of reptiles such as rattlesnakes and lizards. The island is also a great place for bird watching, with bald eagles and peregrine falcons nesting in the cliffs near the shoreline.
Photo gallery

Early History

The island’s history dates back to the early 1800s when it was home to a band of Shoshone Indians. The band is believed to be descended from Chief Pocatello, who led his tribe across the Great Salt Lake in search of new hunting and fishing grounds. Eventually, white settlers moved into the area and began ranching on the island. In 1893, a group of explorers explored the entire island and named it Antelope Island due to its large population of pronghorn antelope.

Today, visitors can still experience a piece of this vibrant history during the summer months when a herd of over 500 antelope moves freely throughout the park. It’s an incredible sight to behold!

Planning your trip to antelope island

Visitors to Antelope Island can experience a variety of activities such as hiking, biking, bird watching, camping, boating and fishing. There are also guided tours available for those interested in learning more about the unique history and geology of the island. Be sure to bring plenty of water and sunscreen since there is little shade on much of the island. Being 1.5 hours from Salt Lake City and 15 minutes from Syracuse, Utah, you're not that far from other resources, if you need them.

lodging/camping

Lodging services are available in several nearby communities. The campground at Antelope Island State Park offers visitors a variety of camping opportunities including RV, tent and group sites. Each site comes equipped with picnic tables, fire rings and access to nearby restrooms. Campers must register with the park before setting up their campsite and are subject to a daily fee that helps support the park’s conservation efforts.

dining

For those looking for a bite to eat, the island is home to a few restaurants and cafes. The Island Buffalo Grill serves classic American fare including burgers, sandwiches and the Buffalo Burger, which is what they're known for. If you're looking for a place that is within a city, then The Bird in Syracuse, Utah is a great option. It has a variety of options, including salads, sandwiches, and desserts.

Fees/permits

Visitors to Antelope Island must purchase a day permit or an annual pass. Day permits are $15 per vehicle and up to eight people. Annual passes are available for $125 for Utah Residents and $175 for Non-Residents and provide unlimited access to the park for one year.

Pets

Pets are allowed on the island but must be kept on a leash at all times and never left unattended. Pets are also not allowed on any of the trails or in the lake or beach areas. Be sure to bring plenty of water for your pet, as well as waste bags to clean up after them.

Seasons

The park is open year-round but park hours vary from season to season.

Tips

The Great Salt Lake area is notorious for bugs, plan accordingly.

Anasazi

Anasazi

Learn More

Antelope Island

Antelope Island

Learn More

Antelope Canyon

Antelope Canyon

Learn More

Bear Lake

Bear Lake

Learn More

Camp Floyd

Camp Floyd

Learn More

Coral Pink Sand Dunes

Coral Pink Sand Dunes

Learn More

Dead Horse Point

Dead Horse Point

Learn More

Deer Creek

Dear Creek

Learn More

East Canyon

East Canyon

Learn More

Echo

Edge of the Cedars

Edge of the Cedars

Learn More

Escalante Petrified Forest

Escalante Petrified Forest

Learn More

Flight Park

Flight Park

Learn More

Freemont Indian

Freemont Indian

Learn More

Frontier Homestead

Frontier Homstead

Learn More

Goblin Valley

Goblin Valley

Learn More

Goosenecks

Goosenecks

Learn More

The Great Salt Lake

The Great Salt Lake

Learn More

Green River

Green River

Learn More

Gunlock

Gunlock

Learn More

Historic Union Pacific Rail Trail

Historic Union Pacific Rail Trail

Learn More

Huntington 

Huntington

Learn More

Hyrum

Jordan River Off-Highway Vehicle

Jordan River Off-Highway Vehicle

Learn More

Jordanelle

Jordanelle

Learn More

Kodachrome Basin

Kodachrome Basin

Learn More

Snow Canyon

Snow Canyon

Learn More

Yuba

magnifiercrossmenuchevron-down