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Time Capsule for the Utah War.

Camp Floyd | Stagecoach Inn State Park

Stagecoaches and the military fort are the main attraction of Camp Floyd.

Elevation: 
4,877 Feet
Camp Floyd / Stagecoach Inn State Park is a state park located in Utah, about an hour south of Salt Lake City. The park contains the remains of an old stagecoach stop and military fort that was used during the Utah War of 1857-58. It is also home to a wide variety of wildlife, including pronghorn antelope, mule deer, and golden eagles.

history

The park was originally founded in 1858 as an outpost for the United States Army to protect travelers along the Overland route from Indian raids. It was later renamed Camp Floyd after Brevet Major General William S. Harney who served in command of the garrison during that time.

The origin of Camp Floyd lies in the Utah War, a conflict between federal troops and Mormon settlers. The Mormons were attempting to create a theocracy in what was then Mexico's province of New Mexico. President James Buchanan sent an army of 2500 soldiers led by Colonel Albert Sidney Johnston to deal with them. In 1858, they established Camp Floyd, the largest military camp in the American West.

The camp was home to a number of different units, including infantry and cavalry regiments. The camp had a saloon, stores, and other buildings that reflected its military nature. There was also a cemetery where many of the soldiers were buried after they died from an illness. In the summers, Camp Floyd was a popular gathering place for social events and dances.

The fort was abandoned in 1861 when the army relocated to California, and the buildings soon began to deter.
Photo gallery

Wildlife

Camp Floyd/Stagecoach Inn State Park is home to a wide variety of wildlife, including pronghorn antelope, mule deer, and golden eagles. Birdwatchers can find over 100 species in the park, making it an ideal spot for spotting rare birds. The nearby Rush Valley also provides excellent opportunities for birdwatching as well.

The park is also home to a number of plants and shrubs, including yucca, sagebrush, and bitterbrush. The red-rock cliffs surrounding the area provide ideal habitat for bighorn sheep and mountain goats.
camp Floyd horses

Geology

The park's distinctive red-rock cliffs are part of the Wasatch Formation, a geologic formation that formed during the Jurassic period. The rocks in this formation are some of the oldest in Utah and date back over 200 million years.

The area is also home to a number of fossilized remains from various species, including dinosaur bones and dinosaur tracks.

Planning your trip to Camp Floyd / Stage Coach Inn State Park

Camp Floyd/Stagecoach Inn State Park is a great destination for outdoor enthusiasts. The area offers plenty of opportunities for hiking, horseback riding, and camping. The park is open year-round but may have limited access during the winter months due to weather conditions. Visitors are advised to check the official website or call ahead before heading out.

The park also offers guided tours and special events throughout the year, including bird-watching hikes, stargazing sessions, and historic fort walks.

lodging/camping

The park offers a variety of amenities, including restrooms, picnic areas, and campgrounds. Visitors can also find lodging at the Stagecoach Inn or a nearby hotel. The Stagecoach Inn features a range of amenities, including wireless internet access, an on-site restaurant and bar, and a gift shop. Visitors can also enjoy the historic furnishings that adorn the building's interior.

Visitors may also enjoy lodging options in nearby Lehi, Utah and American Fork, Utah, which are just 30 minutes away from this state park.

dining

The Camp Floyd/Stagecoach Inn State Park offers a variety of dining options, including sandwiches, salads, and burgers. There are also several restaurants in the nearby towns of Rush Valley, Cedar Fort and Fairfield. Visitors can choose from a range of casual and fine dining experiences.

Fees/permits

There are fees for entrance into the state park. Permits are required for all campfires and off-trail activities. These can be obtained from the park office for a nominal fee. For more information about fees and permits, visit the state park website for all amounts for Camp Floyd State Park.

Pets

Pets are allowed on the island but must be kept on a leash at all times and never left unattended. Pets are also not allowed on any of the trails or in the lake or beach areas. Be sure to bring plenty of water for your pet, as well as waste bags to clean up after them.

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