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Oldest existing government building in the state

Territorial Statehouse State Park

Utah's history and its place within the nation

Territorial Statehouse State Park, located in Fillmore, Utah, is the oldest existing government building in the state. The Territorial Statehouse was built and completed from 1852-1855 to serve as the capital of the Utah Territory. After Salt Lake City became the capital of Utah in 1896, the building continued to be used as a courthouse. In 1957, the Territorial Statehouse became a state park and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971.

Today, visitors can explore the Territorial Statehouse and view exhibits on Utah's history and its place within the nation. The main exhibit on display at the park is called "Utah's Journey," which follows Utah's story from the time of its first inhabitants to the modern day. Visitors can also explore the grounds and view various artifacts, including a bell made in 1856 that still resides in the Statehouse bell tower today.

History

The Territorial Statehouse has a long and rich history. It was established in 1851 when Brigham Young declared Fillmore the capital of the Utah Territory. Construction on the building began in 1852, with completion taking three years. The building served as the government seat for twenty-four years until Salt Lake City became the capital in 1896. Years later, in 1957, the Statehouse became a state park and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1970. Today, visitors can explore its history through exhibits such as “Utah’s Journey” and view various artifacts on display. It is a reminder of our past and how far Utah has come over the years.

Exterior

The exterior of the Territorial Statehouse is a reminder of its historic past. The building is constructed out of red sandstone and native timber that was local to the area, which was quarried two miles away. It features four tall columns on each side, with ornamental details and a bell tower atop the main entrance. Visitors can also view several bronze plaques that commemorate various events in Utah's history, including the state's entrance into the Union in 1896. Today, the Statehouse serves as a reminder of our past and an important part of Utah’s heritage. It is a beloved landmark that stands proudly in Fillmore, Utah.

Interior

The interior of the Territorial Statehouse displays a variety of historic artifacts, including furniture, photographs and other items. Visitors can explore several rooms in the building, including the House Chamber where Utah’s first legislative sessions were held. There is also a courtroom that was used for decades by local judges and officials. Other highlights include a beautiful wooden staircase, a collection of period-style furniture and a library with books dating back to the 1800s. Visitors can view all of these exhibits and learn more about Utah’s past while exploring the Statehouse. It is an interactive experience that allows visitors to connect with our state’s history in a unique and meaningful way.

Planning a trip to Territorial Statehouse State Park

Visiting the Territorial Statehouse State Park in Fillmore, Utah is a great opportunity to experience the history of Utah up close. The museum offers guided tours, special events and exhibits throughout the year. Visitors can also explore the grounds and view historical artifacts on display in the building.

If you're planning on visiting the park, it's important to note that there is an admission fee. The museum is open from 9 am to 5 pm Monday through Saturday and closed on Sundays. Special events may have different hours.

lodging/camping

Lodging near the Territorial Statehouse State Park is available in Fillmore and nearby towns. Visitors can find a range of accommodations, from hotels and motels to bed & breakfasts. Many lodging options offer stunning views of the surrounding countryside and provide easy access to activities like fishing, hunting, hiking, and biking in the surrounding area.

dining

Fillmore and the surrounding towns offer a variety of dining options. Visitors can enjoy a meal at one of the local restaurants or cafes, or they can find quick snacks and refreshments at nearby convenience stores. Local favorites include Mexican cuisine, American comfort food, and traditional Utah dishes. There are also several fast-food locations in the area if you need something quick and easy.

Fees/permits

Day-use fees for Territorial Statehouse State Park are $2 per person and for Utah Seniors 62 and older, it's $1. For more information about fees, visit the state park website for all the amounts for Territorial Statehouse State Park.

Pets

Pets are welcome on the grounds but not in the building itself.

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