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Abundant and varied.

Wildlife in Grand Canyon National Park

A variety of animals

Wildlife in Grand Canyon National Park is abundant and varied. From large mammals like elk, bighorn sheep, and mule deer to small creatures such as skunks, bats, lizards, and more than 60 species of birds, the park's wildlife has adapted to the harsh environment over millions of years. Visitors to Grand Canyon National Park can expect to see a variety of animals, from wide-eyed squirrels and chipmunks scurrying along the trails to majestic elk grazing on the grassy meadows.

Canyon Wren

The canyon wren is a small grayish-brown bird found throughout Grand Canyon National Park. It is easily identified by its loud, melodious song, heard during the day from rocky ledges and canyon walls. Despite its name, the canyon wren can also be found in lowland woodlands. This species feeds on insects and other invertebrates which it finds in rocky crevices or by digging through leaf litter on the ground. They build their nests in cavities, usually rock crevices, and are highly territorial.

Belted Kingfisher

The belted kingfisher is a large, colorful bird found along the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National Park. This species feeds on small fish and other aquatic creatures which it catches by diving from high perches. It has a loud, raspy call that can be heard echoing through the canyon walls. The males are identified by their white chest and blue-gray back, while the females have a brownish chest and gray backs.

Bison

The largest land mammal in the United States, bison are also found at Grand Canyon National Park. After nearly being hunted to extinction in the late 1800s, herds of bison have been reintroduced into remote areas of the park and can be seen grazing on grasslands near the canyon's rim. Bison are powerful animals with shaggy brown fur and horns that can reach up to two feet in length.

Javelina

Javelina, also known as a collared peccary or musk hog, are often called reds when young due to their fur color at that stage. Although they share some similarities with pigs, javelinas are actually a separate species of hoofed mammals. These animals trace their lineage back to ancestors who migrated from Asia to Central and South America, crossing over the Bering land bridge. Keep an eye out for javelinas on the South Rim of Grand Canyon National Park.

Gila Monster

The Gila Monster is a large reptile native to the desert regions of the southwestern United States. This species makes its home in Grand Canyon National Park, where it can be spotted during the hottest months of summer, sunning itself on rocks near water sources. These animals are easily identified by their bright orange and black scales and thick, stubby tail. The Gila Monster is a venomous species, capable of inflicting serious injury or even death with its bite. Despite this, they are generally docile and will not attack unless provoked.'

Gopher Snake

The gopher snake is a common species of reptile found in the Grand Canyon. These snakes are identified by their thick body, dark brown scales, and light yellow belly. They grow to an average length of four to five feet and feed on small rodents, lizards, birds, eggs, insects, and other small creatures that they find in the park's rugged landscape. The gopher snake is non-venomous, and its primary defense against predators is to coil up in a tight ball and puff up its body to scare away potential threats. This species can often be seen basking in the sun on rocky ledges or roadsides within the park.

Canyon Tree Frog

The canyon tree frog is a small amphibian found in Grand Canyon National Park and other areas of the southwestern United States. This species can often be heard calling from its hiding places during the warmer months of the year. It has bright green skin, brown eyes, and orange patches on its legs. The canyon tree frog feeds mainly on insects, but it may also eat small lizards or other amphibians. This species is highly venomous, so it's important to be careful when handling these frogs. They are an important part of the canyon's ecosystem, and they help keep insect populations in check.

Tiger Salamander

The tiger salamander is the largest species of amphibian in the United States, and it can be found living in Grand Canyon National Park. These animals have an olive-brown or black body with orange to yellow stripes running along its back. They are carnivorous and feed mainly on small insects and worms which they find near streams or other bodies of water. The tiger salamander is a shy creature, but it can be seen occasionally out in the open during the warmer months of the year. They are an important part of the park's wildlife and they help to keep pest populations in check.

Anasazi

Anasazi

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Antelope Island

Antelope Island

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Antelope Canyon

Antelope Canyon

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Bear Lake

Bear Lake

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Camp Floyd

Camp Floyd

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Coral Pink Sand Dunes

Coral Pink Sand Dunes

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Dead Horse Point

Dead Horse Point

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Deer Creek

Dear Creek

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East Canyon

East Canyon

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Echo

Edge of the Cedars

Edge of the Cedars

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Escalante Petrified Forest

Escalante Petrified Forest

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Flight Park

Flight Park

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Freemont Indian

Freemont Indian

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Frontier Homestead

Frontier Homstead

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Goblin Valley

Goblin Valley

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Goosenecks

Goosenecks

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The Great Salt Lake

The Great Salt Lake

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Green River

Green River

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Gunlock

Gunlock

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Historic Union Pacific Rail Trail

Historic Union Pacific Rail Trail

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Huntington 

Huntington

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Hyrum

Jordan River Off-Highway Vehicle

Jordan River Off-Highway Vehicle

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Jordanelle

Jordanelle

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Kodachrome Basin

Kodachrome Basin

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Snow Canyon

Snow Canyon

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Yuba

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