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History of Green River State Park

Historic Scenery

Green River State Park is located in eastern Utah, near the town of Green River. The park spans over 80 acres and is situated along the banks of the Green River, offering a variety of outdoor recreational activities for visitors to enjoy. But before it became a state park, this land held significant historical importance. Let's delve into the rich history of Green River State Park.

Native American History

The area where Green River State Park is now located has been inhabited by Native American tribes for thousands of years. The most notable tribe was the Ute Indians, who used the Green River as a vital water source and a route for trade and travel. They also utilized the surrounding land for hunting and gathering resources. The Ute Indians considered the area sacred and had numerous spiritual and cultural ties to it.
The Green River

Explorers and Settlers

During the early 1800s, European explorers began to venture into what is now Utah. In 1776, two Spanish priests named Dominguez and Escalante explored the area and encountered the Ute Indians. Later in the mid-1800s, Mormon settlers established a ferry crossing on the Green River near present-day Green River State Park. This crossing became a popular stop for travelers on the Mormon Pioneer Trail, which was used by thousands of settlers migrating west.

Formation of the Park

The land that makes up Green River State Park was initially owned by the Denny family, who operated a ferry service on the Green River. In 1959, the state of Utah purchased the land and designated it as a state park. The park officially opened to the public in 1965. Since then, the park has undergone several renovations and improvements to enhance its facilities and recreational opportunities.

Early Days at Green River State Park

During its early years, Green River State Park was primarily a place for picnics and camping. The park also had a small swimming area and offered boat rentals for visitors to explore the Green River. It quickly became a popular spot for families to spend their weekends. The park also hosted several events and festivals, including the Annual Melon Days Festival, which still takes place every September.

The Green River

The Green River runs through the heart of the park and is a major attraction for visitors. It is an important tributary of the Colorado River and spans over 730 miles, making it one of the longest rivers in the United States. The river's lush banks provide a habitat for various plant and animal species, making it a popular spot for nature enthusiasts. The Green River also offers a range of recreational activities such as fishing, rafting, and kayaking. It is one of the main reasons why Green River State Park has become such a popular destination for outdoor enthusiasts. The river's emerald green waters and scenic surroundings make it a unique and beautiful sight to behold.

Development and Expansion

Over the years, Green River State Park went through several developments and expansions to improve its facilities and attractions. In 1973, a new campground was built, and in 1974, a nine-hole golf course was added. The park also constructed a boat ramp and dock to cater to the increasing number of boaters on the Green River. In 1993, a new visitor center was built to provide information and educational exhibits about the park's history and natural resources. Today, Green River State Park offers a wide range of amenities, including picnic areas, RV and tent camping sites, group pavilions, playgrounds, and hiking trails.

Geological Wonders

Apart from its historical significance, Green River State Park is also known for its unique geological formations. The San Rafael Swell, a massive upthrust of rock layers, can be seen in the distance from the park. The Swasey's Leap rock formation, located just a few miles away from the park, is also a popular attraction for hikers and photographers.

Modern Times at Green River State Park

Today, Green River State Park continues to be a popular destination for outdoor enthusiasts. It offers a range of recreational activities such as camping, boating, fishing, golfing, and wildlife viewing. The park also hosts events and festivals, such as the annual Melon Days celebration, which celebrates the town's agricultural heritage.

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